Tailgating Safety Tips

September 19th, 2014

tailgating-tips

Cooler temperatures bring relief from summer heat, and more importantly they usher in tailgating season. As you hit the road to help cheer on your favorite team, we want you to be safe. Food safety, driving safety and drinking safety are all important considerations when you’re in a packed parking lot. We have compiled some tips that will ensure nothing goes wrong while you’re having fun.

tailgating-grilling-safeTailgate Grilling Safety

Portable grills are a huge convenience but they are also a huge safety hazard when improperly used. Always setup grills on level, non-flammable surfaces. Any surface that isn’t completely even can create a tipping hazard and cause a fire. If you are using a gas grill, never light it with the lid closed, which can cause an explosion. Likewise, don’t place grills within 15 feet of anything containing gasoline, including your vehicle. That way if a fire does get out of control, you can put it out without a catastrophe occurring. Finally, make sure you take along a fire extinguisher. Even if you don’t need it yourself, you may be able to save the day for a fellow tailgater.

Driving Safety

Don’t assume that you can park anywhere, even if other cars are there, or you may come back to find your vehicle has been towed. Park only in designated tailgating areas. If you leave your vehicle to watch the game, lock up all valuables or take them with you. Additionally, drive much slower than normal when entering and exiting the parking lot. Tailgating events have pets, children and people wandering around aimlessly. Drive cautiously to avoid any accidents.
tailgate-drink

Tailgate Drinking Safety

First and foremost, never let anyone drive who has consumed alcohol. Designate a driver at the very beginning for each vehicle in your party. Drink responsibly by not consuming more than you can tolerate without losing the ability to make sound judgment. A good rule of thumb is to only drink one alcoholic beverage per hour. Additionally, avoid consuming both alcohol and energy drinks together, which can increase the effects of alcohol and cause faster impaired judgment. Tailgating hosts should watch guests carefully for signs of alcohol intoxication and seek medical attention immediately if needed.

 

Tailgating Sun Safety

Too much sun can increase the effects of alcohol and lead to a nasty burn that ruins the party. Always apply sunscreen with an spf of 30 at least 30 minutes before you head outdoors. Additionally, low-cost pop-up tents and shelters are perfect for keeping the sun off and making party goers more comfortable. Hosts should also be sure to keep plenty of water and non-alcoholic beverages on hand to help guests rehydrate.

tailgate-canopy

The information in this article was obtained from various sources. This content is offered for educational purposes only and does not represent contractual agreements, nor is it intended to replace manuals or instructions provided by the manufacturer or the advice of a qualified professional. The definitions, terms and coverage in a given policy may be different than those suggested here and such policy will be governed by the language contained therein. No warranty or appropriateness for a specific purpose is expressed or implied.

How to Dog Proof Your Car

September 17th, 2014

dog-proof-car

Some dogs love to go for rides in the car as much as, or even more than their owner likes to drive. If you can’t imagine going for a long drive without your pet in tow, but dislike the mess he creates, there are a few ways to protect your car. While dog proofing your vehicle won’t keep Fido from making a mess, it will reduce cleanup time considerably, making you more likely to want to bring him along for the ride.

Cover Up

dog-seat-cover

Muddy paws, shedding fur, the occasional accident or sickness – there are plenty of ways for your dog to do some damage to your car’s seats. You can protect those seats in a few ways. Before you let your pet step paw into the vehicle, spray the seats with an upholstery or leather protector. The protecting spray should create a barrier on the surface of the seats’ material, so that it won’t be stained or ruined by water, mud, and other substances.

Once you’ve shielded the seats, the next step is to cover them up. You can invest in specially made seat covers, designed to act as a barrier between the seat and your dog’s fur. Another option is to drape an old blanket over the seats. It may not look as attractive as a special cover, but you’ll be able to take it out easily, shake it off, or throw it into the wash as needed.

dog-safe-window-glass

Wrap the Windows

If your dog enjoys riding in the car with you, it could be that he likes to watch the world speed by him through the windows. You might think that’s cute, but be less than thrilled about the slimy trail his nose leaves on the windows of the backseat. Instead of having to break out the window cleaner after every trip, be proactive about protecting them. Smooth a piece of plastic wrap over the window before each car ride, then peel it off when you get home. All evidence of your pet will be pulled away with the plastic.

pet-lint-rollersKeep a Lint Brush and Cleaners Handy

Even with a seat cover and plastic wrap over the windows, your pet might succeed in messing up the back of your car. Tuck a small lint brush or roller into your glove box, so that you can quickly pick up loose hairs after your trip. Stash a bottle of spray cleaner and some paper towels in the trunk or cargo area of the car, so that you can wipe up any spills just after they happen.

If you drive with your dog, you not only want to protect the interior of your car, but you also want to make sure you protect your pet. Be aware of any laws you state has about driving with your furry friend. In most cases, it’s best to keep your dog in the back seat, so he can’t distract you as you drive.

 

 

 

The information in this article was obtained from various sources. This content is offered for educational purposes only and does not represent contractual agreements, nor is it intended to replace manuals or instructions provided by the manufacturer or the advice of a qualified professional. The definitions, terms and coverage in a given policy may be different than those suggested here and such policy will be governed by the language contained therein. No warranty or appropriateness for a specific purpose is expressed or implied.

Rental Car 101

September 15th, 2014

car-rental-tips

When you sign your name on the dotted line of a rental car agreement, you are essentially assuming full responsibility for that vehicle. If the car/truck/SUV should be involved in an accident or get damaged in any way, you will be responsible for paying for any repairs and in some cases the cost to replace the car. Before you rent another car, it is a good idea to brush up on some rental car tips that can help you save money. These tips will guide you through the all-important walk around inspection and help you determine if extra rental car insurance should be purchased.

The Walk Around Inspection

rental-car-inspection
Rental car companies will conduct a brief walk around inspection before renting the car out. This inspection is designed to give the rental company an idea of the condition of the car before it was rented out to you. It is what will be used to determine if any damage has occurred to the car while in your possession. While it might seem unimportant, this walk around inspection is one of the most important activities you will engage in while renting a car. After all, it is what will be used to determine what – if any – repair charges will be billed to you.

Some things to keep in mind during the walk around inspection that will help protect you include:

  1. Always walk around with the agent during the inspection process.
  2. Do not hesitate to point out any dings, scratches, or problem areas.
  3. Look inside and outside of the car – some companies will say the inside does not matter, but it is best to have it noted just in case.
  4. Make sure to point out anything and have it marked down on the inspection paper – even if it may be dirt/shadowing; if you feel it could be classified as prior damage have it marked down.
  5. After the rental is complete, you may feel that you can toss out the inspection report that you had for the rental car. It is best to keep the walk around inspection report for several months, as it will help you if a rental company tries to charge you for any repairs.


Should You or Shouldn’t You Purchase Additional Rental Car Insurance?

rental-car-insurance
Possessing the proper insurance could save you thousands of dollars if you were to get into an accident while driving a rental car. While there is no question whether or not you should have insurance to drive, the main question that arises is ‘should you purchase additional rental car insurance‘ or ‘is my current auto insurance coverage enough’?

The answer to this question depends upon a number of factors, including how much the cost of the car is that you are renting and what type of insurance coverage you currently possess. Some things to consider include:

  1. If the car costs more than your policy limit – purchase additional coverage.
  2. If you do not have collision coverage and only have a policy that offers liability – purchase additional coverage.
  3. If you are worried about loss of use, replacement costs, or administrative fees – purchase additional coverage.
  4. If your current insurance coverage offers coverage to rental cars, has liability/collision coverage, and covers the total amount of the rental car – additional coverage may not be needed.

Many individuals pass on the additional insurance option because it costs extra, but that could be a costly mistake. The costs associated with replacing a rental car or paying for repairs could total in the thousands. Purchasing the additional rental car coverage could save you money in the long run, if the car should be in an accident or accidentally damaged.

An AIS Auto Insurance Specialist can help answer any questions about personal insurance coverage you may have- feel free to call today!

(888)772-4247.

 

The information in this article was obtained from various sources. This content is offered for educational purposes only and does not represent contractual agreements, nor is it intended to replace manuals or instructions provided by the manufacturer or the advice of a qualified professional. The definitions, terms and coverage in a given policy may be different than those suggested here and such policy will be governed by the language contained therein. No warranty or appropriateness for a specific purpose is expressed or implied.

How to Deal With Potholes

September 13th, 2014

Dealing with Potholes

A pothole is a type of failure in an asphalt pavement, caused by water in the underlying soil beneath it. Consistent traffic fatigues and breaks the poorly supported asphalt surface in creating a hole, also creates a pothole. The holes that form in the roadway can do severe damage to your vehicle, from puncturing its tires to knocking its steering out of alignment. While you can’t do much more than contact your city government, you can take steps to protect your car and your wallet from pothole damage.

Damage From Potholes

Pothole Damage
The list of damage that can be caused by a pothole is pretty long. Some of the damage you can see clearly, such as a dented wheel rim or punctured tire. Other types of damage might not be visible, but you’ll be able to feel it while driving. If a pothole did a number on your car’s steering or alignment, you’ll most likely feel the car pulling to one side or another, even if you’re trying to drive in a straight line. A pothole can also damage the engine and undercarriage of your vehicle. If you see fluid leaking from beneath the car or hear funny noises when you turn it on, a pothole may be to blame.

Avoiding Potholes

When it comes to potholes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Pay attention when you drive and take note of the behaviors of the cars around you. If you see a car ahead of you pulling into another lane or driving over to the shoulder, you can safely assume that there’s a pothole up ahead. Slow down and drive around it. Be careful not to swerve too sharply, as you risk losing control of your car.
Avoiding Potholes

Protecting Your Car From Potholes

Some potholes are sneaky and can come up on you with little warning. If you can’t avoid one, the next best thing is to drive in a way that reduces the impact on your car. Slow down as soon as you see the pothole, to reduce the amount of force with which you car hits it. Keep a tight grip on the steering wheel, so that your car isn’t thrown to one side or the other when you drive over the hole.

If You Hit a Pothole

Depending on the impact of the hit and what part of your car is damaged, hitting a pothole can do serious damage to your wallet. If your car seems off in any way after you run over a pothole, bring it into your mechanic. Your car’s insurance may cover the damage done.

In some cases, cities and towns will reimburse drivers whose cars have been damaged by potholes. However, it can take months for reimbursement to come through and the city might not give you the full amount or may even deny your claim. It’s still worth it to file a claim, so you don’t go broke trying to navigate your town after a rough winter.

Potholes

The information in this article was obtained from various sources. This content is offered for educational purposes only and does not represent contractual agreements, nor is it intended to replace manuals or instructions provided by the manufacturer or the advice of a qualified professional. The definitions, terms and coverage in a given policy may be different than those suggested here and such policy will be governed by the language contained therein. No warranty or appropriateness for a specific purpose is expressed or implied.

Home Improvement, Best Left For the Pros

September 11th, 2014

Professional-Home-Improvement

Undertaking a home improvement project on your own may not be a good idea if you lack the skills to do the job correctly. While a homeowner may be able to take on small projects such as replacing the kitchen faucet or installing some shelves, more complex projects are better left to the pro’s. If you don’t know what you are doing, you could make a costly mess, and even worse, injure yourself in the attempt to do the job. Hire a professional when a home improvement project is complex, requires specific expertise, special tools, and particular attention to safety.

Roof-Repair-Professional-Home-Improvement

1. Repairing a Roof

This is not a job for an amateur. While replacing a few shingles is not very difficult, you run the risk of losing your balance and falling off the roof. The danger increases with the pitch of the roof and the amount of work that needs to be done.

2. Electrical Work

Anything that involves electricity can be inherently dangerous. While it might be okay to install a ceiling fan or replace a light switch, anything more complicated is best left to an electrician. Installing recessed lighting is not a do-it-yourself project. Leave it to the professional to get up on a ladder, drill holes in the ceiling, run electrical wire, install the fixtures, and make everything look pretty.
Professional-Home-Improvement-Plumbing-Repair

3. Plumbing

Anytime water is involved, there is the potential for disaster if the job is not done correctly. A homeowner should not attempt to install a hot water heater on his own or mess with buried supply lines outside or under the house. Pipes may need to be cut and welded or a special camera may be required to determine the exact location of a leak or blockage. Leave it to the pro to detect the problem and fix it.

4. Installing a Ceramic Tile Floor

There is much more to properly installing a ceramic tile floor than simply applying some glue and placing the tiles next to each other. You may have to remove the old flooring and then prepare the sub-floor. If it is cracked or not level, the job becomes more complicated. To get a professional appearance, some tiles have to be cut. A skilled installer will do the necessary preparation, lay out the tile in a pleasing pattern, and finish the job in a timely manner.

5. Structural Changes

When you start knocking out walls to create a more open floor plan, you better be sure that you are not knocking out any load-bearing walls. You may also have to deal with wiring inside of the walls. Leave it to a pro to do the demolition or construction of a wall.

Remember, your homeowners insurance will not cover any damage that you do if a home improvement project you undertake goes wrong. Hiring a licensed and insured professional is the way to make sure the job is done right.

Structure-Additions-Professional-Home-Improvement

 

The information in this article was obtained from various sources. This content is offered for educational purposes only and does not represent contractual agreements, nor is it intended to replace manuals or instructions provided by the manufacturer or the advice of a qualified professional. The definitions, terms and coverage in a given policy may be different than those suggested here and such policy will be governed by the language contained therein. No warranty or appropriateness for a specific purpose is expressed or implied.

 

How To Read Food Labels

September 9th, 2014

Reading Food Labels Correctly

Food nutrition labels are intended to help you choose healthier food options, but deciphering them can be challenging. In fact, to properly read a nutritional label, consumers must have a basic understanding of nutritional requirements. We want to help you make healthy food choices by breaking down the terms used on nutritional labels and explaining how to identify healthier foods.

Important Numbers

reading-food-labelFood label numbers apply to adults on a 2000-calorie a day diet, not to children, active adults or those on restricted diets.

  • Serving Size - The serving size is the amount of product that the remaining numbers on the label apply to. Thus, it is one of the most important numbers. Many people underestimate the amount that they eat and miscount their nutritional intake when reading the label. For example, a chip label may refer to 10 pieces as the serving size, but realistically you may eat 20 pieces. Start by understanding the serving size that you will actually eat so that you can increase the remaining numbers accordingly.
  • Calories – The label also displays the calories and the calories from fat. While it’s best to choose low-calorie products, not all calories are bad. To identify healthy products, look for ones with a low number of calories from fat.
  • Fat, Cholesterol, Sodium, Sugar - These ingredients are not beneficial and you should choose foods with the lowest amounts possible.
  • Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Calcium and Iron - These are all beneficial items that you should aim to eat more of.




Recommended Daily Values

Nutritional labels are required by the Food and Drug Administration and list both beneficial and harmful components of the food. Each item has a recommended daily intake number represented by the term % DV. For beneficial items, the label shows how much you should consume in a day and the percentage contained in a single serving of that food. For negative items such as fat, sodium or cholesterol, the label provides the maximum amount recommended and the percentage contained in a serving of the food.

Reading Nutrition Label TipsTotal fat should be limited to between 56 and 78 grams a day and cholesterol intake should be 300 mg or less. This includes 16 grams of saturated fat and less than two grams of trans fat. When a product contains zero trans fat, it actually means that there are fewer than 0.5 grams per serving. If you eat more than one serving you will quickly reach your limit of trans fat.

Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Calcium and Iron are all beneficial elements and you should consume 100 percent of the daily-recommended value of each. In general, nutrient values that are 5 percent are low and values of 20 percent are high in nutrients.

The information in this article was obtained from various sources. This content is offered for educational purposes only and does not represent contractual agreements, nor is it intended to replace manuals or instructions provided by the manufacturer or the advice of a qualified professional. The definitions, terms and coverage in a given policy may be different than those suggested here and such policy will be governed by the language contained therein. No warranty or appropriateness for a specific purpose is expressed or implied.

Buying a Boat 101

September 7th, 2014

buying-a-boat

Buying a Watercraft is a Great Experience

Whether you are buying a yacht, rowboat, power boat, canoe, jet boat, sailboat or any type of watercraft there are many things to consider. Some are obvious, but others may surprise you a bit. We have listed a few tips to consider before your purchase.

Four Things to Consider

Used-Boat

Should You Buy New or Used?

Depending on the time of the year, you can usually get great deals on new equipment late in the year when dealers are moving out last years’ models. Buying boats is very similar to buying cars in that there are always new models coming on the scene. New boats have many advantages like warranties, dealers who you know will stand behind them and help you get your boat seaworthy. Used boats come with a bit more risk. Just like a used car, there are many things that go wrong with used boats. Take your time and check all the details just as you would for a car.

 

Should You Lease or Buy?

Just like cars, there are companies who offer leasing specifically for boat owners. You need to do your homework and understand the financial ramifications, but a lease usually required less money up front and gives you more flexibility.

Accessories Can Add Up!

buy-boat-trailerDepending on the boat, you need a trailer, covers, gas cans, extra sails, extra motors, heaters, a wash down system, sail furling systems, a place to stow the boat when not in use and more. Ask your dealer or the seller what other items you need. You can easily spend an additional 10-20% more for accessories and don’t forget consumables like gas and oil. Wind is free but even with a sail boat you need gas for auxiliary power. Depending on your intended usage, you may also need to invest in skis, ropes, life jackets, poles, sounding equipment, special chairs and more.

boating-insurance

Don’t forget Your Insurance!

You are putting a lot of your hard-earned money on the line and you want to insure your purchase for the full value. According to the United States Coast Guard, boating accidents are on the rise and most states require liability insurance to operate a boat.

Summary

Buying a boat is a great experience. Make it even better by lining up all your questions, contacting an insurance agent to make sure you have proper coverage and have fun!

 

 

The information in this article was obtained from various sources. This content is offered for educational purposes only and does not represent contractual agreements, nor is it intended to replace manuals or instructions provided by the manufacturer or the advice of a qualified professional. The definitions, terms and coverage in a given policy may be different than those suggested here and such policy will be governed by the language contained therein. No warranty or appropriateness for a specific purpose is expressed or implied.

How Smart Homes Work?

September 5th, 2014

how-smart-homes-work

Imagine a world where your thermostat automatically raises or lowers the temperature in your home 30 minutes before you return home from work, a world where you can monitor activity in your home, even when you’re across the country, and a world where your refrigerator can also play music or send email. For some people, that world is already here, thanks to smart home technology. Having a smart home can offer you peace of mind, as well as a reduced energy bill and considerable savings.

smart-home-energy-efficency

Increased Energy Efficiency

One of the biggest benefits of bringing smart technology into your home, whether that technology is a programmable and adaptable thermostat or a smart dishwasher that only runs at the time of day when energy is cheapest, is the potential energy savings. Smart technology takes things to the next level by automating the process of reducing energy. It’s no longer up to you to remember to turn the thermostat up or down or to remember to run the dishwasher at 9 pm.

A 2012 study on programmable thermostats from the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy found that a programmable thermostat only saved energy if it was operated as intended. Older thermostats required a person to remember to program and set them. Newer thermostats, such as Nest, learn to program themselves. The device learns to recognize when no one is home and will set itself to an away temperature. Since the thermostat has a WiFi connection, you can program it using your phone, even when you’re miles away.

smart-home-security

Improved Safety and Security

A smart home is also a safe home. Many smart home security systems include an app for smartphones that allows you to check in on your house when you’re at work or elsewhere. Using the app, you can also disarm the security system when you get home or lock the doors and windows of your house remotely. The technology means that you’ll never have that sinking feeling that you forgot to lock up the house again. You can instantly check in on your home with your mobile device.


smart-home-convenienceGreater Convenience

Beyond greater efficiency and security, another perk of creating a smart home is overall greater convenience. You don’t have to spend time each day playing with the thermostat or worrying about running the dishwasher. A refrigerator that can connect to the Internet lets you stream your favorite music while you cook or make a shopping list while you wait for something to finish baking.

Adding one or more smart devices to your home can make you feel more at ease and make your living space more comfortable. With smart technology, your home really does become your castle.

 

The information in this article was obtained from various sources. This content is offered for educational purposes only and does not represent contractual agreements, nor is it intended to replace manuals or instructions provided by the manufacturer or the advice of a qualified professional. The definitions, terms and coverage in a given policy may be different than those suggested here and such policy will be governed by the language contained therein. No warranty or appropriateness for a specific purpose is expressed or implied.

 

Helpful Moving Day Tips

September 3rd, 2014

moving-day-tips

Did you know nearly 12 percent of Americans moved homes between 2012 and 2013, according to the US Census Bureau? If you’re going to be among that 12 or so percent this year, there are a few things you can do before and during your move to make it a little less of a hassle and a little bit more enjoyable. Planning is everything when it comes to moving, so the sooner you start getting ready to relocate, the better things will go.
pare-unused-items-tip

Pare Down Your Possessions

One side benefit of moving is that it gives you a chance to really examine the stuff you own and decide whether or not it’s worth moving from point A to point B. When deciding whether you’re going to take something to your new home or not, ask yourself when you used it last and whether you’ll need to use it again in the next few months. If the answer is more than a few months ago and no, you can safely donate or discard the item. Another thing to ask yourself when reviewing the stuff you own is whether the things are nearing the end of their useful life. You probably don’t need to bring along a pair of holey jeans or a set of bedding that’s torn and stained.



organize-moving-boxes-tip

Organize Organize Organize

Make sure your unpacking process goes as smoothly as possible by labeling your boxes. Either print out labels or use a sharpie to put what is in the box, if it is fragile, and what room it belongs in. This will make unloading the truck or trailer a breeze. Remember to label on the side of the box and not the top so you can still see the label when boxes are stacked.

Research Your Moving Company

If you’ll be trusting your stuff to a moving company, find out as much as you can about the company before you sign or agree to anything. Don’t just get references from friends, double check to confirm that the company is licensed by the US DOT, especially if you are moving from one state to another. You can also check up on the company by looking it up on the Better Business Bureau.

Insure Your Move

Typically, when you work with a moving company, your possessions are covered in one of two ways. If you purchase full value protection coverage from the mover, your replacement value of your stuff is covered. In some cases, the insurance limits coverage of valuable items, such as jewelry.

moving-insurance-tip

Another insurance option is released value. While released value insurance costs the least, it also offers the least amount of coverage, just 60 cents per pound of possessions. If you choose released value, you might want to purchase third party insurance in case something happens to your stuff en route. Your homeowners insurance may or may not cover your move, so make sure you review your policy before you purchase third party insurance.

Pack a “Right Away” Box

When you get to your new home, there will be some things you want to focus on first. Make things easy on yourself by packing a “right away” or “open first” box. Put a change of clothes for each family member in the box, as well as clean towels and fresh bedding. That way, when you get to your residence, you won’t have to open box after box before getting a good night’s sleep.

Moving day doesn’t have to be a stressful event! If you are well organized, prepared, and insured, moving can be fun. If you have questions regarding your insurance coverage during your move an AIS Specialist would be happy to find you the best plan- please call (888) 772-4247


The information in this article was obtained from various sources. This content is offered for educational purposes only and does not represent contractual agreements, nor is it intended to replace manuals or instructions provided by the manufacturer or the advice of a qualified professional. The definitions, terms and coverage in a given policy may be different than those suggested here and such policy will be governed by the language contained therein. No warranty or appropriateness for a specific purpose is expressed or implied.

 

How to Conserve Water During a Drought

August 31st, 2014

conserve-water-stop-drought

Many areas of the western United States are experiencing a particularly nasty drought right now. This is making water into a valuable and precious resource in those areas. No one knows how long the drought will last, or how bad it will get before it’s done. Even when it is over, it will take a long time for the area to recover its water levels.
It’s important to know how to save water during a drought, because every drop counts when rain is scarce. Do your part to help keep the faucets flowing by following these water-saving tips.

water-conservation-devices

1. Install Low-Flow Water Devices on Your Toilet, Shower, and Washing Machine

Everything will get just as clean with low-flow devices as it will without them. In fact, most of our water-using appliances are configured to use much more water than is necessary. By installing low-flow devices, you are keeping water usage reasonable, helping the environment, and saving money on your water bill, too. You may have to get used to taking showers with a little less water pressure than you’ve previously been used to, but the overall benefits to the earth are worth it.

2. Stop Watering Your Grass

One of the biggest water wasters out there is lawn maintenance. Those automatic sprinkler systems use a ton of water that could be saved and used to help people who need drinking water. Even using a hose to water your lawn uses more water than you may think!

We’ve all become attached to our nice green lawns. In fact, some cities have ordinances that require them (though most places will lift this requirement if there is a serious drought). The best way to have a nice looking lawn while avoiding watering it is to either install realistic looking faux grass, or to landscape your yard with drought-resistant plants and rocks. None of these things require watering, and your lawn will still look beautiful.
dont-use-water

3. Don’t Wash Your Car

Much like a green lawn, a shiny car is just something most of us have gotten used to having all the time, even though it is not a necessity. Washing your car at home or at a car wash uses more water than can be spared for such things during a drought. If it’s driving you crazy not to have a clean car, there are a number of waterless cleaning treatments at your local auto supply store.

 

The important thing to remember in a drought is that every drop of water saved is precious. That water can go for drinking, bathing, and sanitation, rather than frivolous things. Do your part to help your community, the earth, and even yourself by using these water saving tips if you’re living in drought conditions.

water-conservation
The information in this article was obtained from various sources. This content is offered for educational purposes only and does not represent contractual agreements, nor is it intended to replace manuals or instructions provided by the manufacturer or the advice of a qualified professional. The definitions, terms and coverage in a given policy may be different than those suggested here and such policy will be governed by the language contained therein. No warranty or appropriateness for a specific purpose is expressed or implied.